Tag Archives: children

Teaching Your Child: What Type of Learner is Your Child?

Every child is different, so is every parent. I learned this on day one. I have more than one kid, and I have been doing this for a while. But guess what? It never gets easier. My kids may look like near carbon copies of one another (I apparently make one type of kid, I swear they look like twins 4 years apart, minus the fact they are different genders) they are absolutely nothing alike. One is the easiest going kid you will ever meet. Is polite, outgoing, brave, ready to learn, and learns very quickly. Once is shy, a momma’s boy, takes his time to warm up to new places, situations, and people, and is smart but works more methodically. They couldn’t be more different. Its ok. It just make for a change in my parenting style with each kid. Any parent that tells you that one style works for every child, has never had more than one child. Everyone is different. I also have a very different relationship with each child. Which is ok too. My daughter is my partner. We work together, she learns alongside me as we play, work in the yard, cook, clean, workout, and read. My son needs a teacher, a mentor, someone who stands over him and guides him. It doesn’t mean he isn’t as smart, it doesn’t mean I think he needs more help. it is just the way in which he absorbs knowledge.

I taught Special Education for years before staying home to be with my own children. It helped me see that every child is different. I truly think it guided me to understand that I have no control over my kids. They are who they are. I am simply guiding them to be the best version of who they are.

When I work with them I play to their strengths and weaknesses. My daughter shadows me to learn. She has already begun clearing her own dinner from the table, making her bed, and helping to do the dishes and cook meals. She watches what we do, and she replicates it. We make sure to model things at her level. When she sees how easy it is to do something, she goes ahead and tries. By doing this with her we have shown her how to begin taking care of her own mess, and even make her own snacks. We have moved all of her food to the lowest level of cupboards and created a snack and utensil area at just her level. Now she does things for herself.

My son needs more one-on-one interaction. When we teach him a new skill we repeat it over and over. We make it a game. each step leads to the next. He even gets a sticker reward when he completes each task. This has helped him figure out how to dress himself and put away his toys.

Self-Sufficiency is a lesson that we teach everyday of our children’s lives. It doesn’t end at a specific stage. But if you find your child’s learning queues you can make it easier for everyone involved. Take a few days to watch and observe your kids. Do they need more help, less help, do they do things on their own, do they need extra motivation? No matter what type of learner they are you can help them. Just remember not to put to much pressure on yourself, being a parent is hard. But it can also be very rewarding. Especially when you can sit on the couch and watch your child get their own snack while you take a five minute break.

Teaching Kids about Money

Money is one of those things that makes the world go round. We may not like that it has so much of a say in how our lives are, but it does indeed make a big difference. Money is a part of our everyday lives even from a very young age.  At a young age we do not really have any real understanding of how to handle money. Eventually we save it and make it work for us. We don’t really learn how to handle money in school. It really comes down to our parents teaching us or learning by trial and error.

Many parents wait to teach their kids about money when they are teenagers. But it is possible to teach your kids how to handle money even as young as three years old. Teaching your kids about money from a young age might help increase their understanding of how to handle it and save throughout their lives.

teaching kids about money

Educent is a blog that helps educate people about money and how to handle it and make it work for you. Educent teaches different methods introducing money to children of different age groups, including children as young as 3 years old. Check out their ideas for teaching kids about money, it may help keep you and your kids financially smart.

Positive Parenting: Taming the Tantrum

We have all been there. Our kid is throwing a tantrum, they are screaming at the top of their lungs, they are telling us no. They do not want to cooperate, they do not want to listen. They have made up their mind, so now what do you do? You feel defeated, you feel angry, and you feel embarrassed. All of these emotions and more are completely normal. Both the parent and the child are in the midst of an emotional battle, mostly amongst their own emotions. Mom is warring with her inner mom, and child is warring with their own emotions. It’s a very difficult situation.

It can be made infinitely worse by being somewhere public. It is human nature to want to appear like we all have it together. Well, guess what, we don’t, and that’s ok. Everyone may be watching, and judging, but guess what? I can guarantee they have all been there, and if they haven’t they are lying.

So what do we do when we are at our wits end. Honestly, there is no cure all. Kids have tantrums, parents argue with them during tantrums, parents get upset, kids get upset. But does the world end? Nope. Child development experts tell us that children have tantrums because they cannot control their emotions or rule their world quite yet. Which makes sense, if you couldn’t make yourself calm down, and you were in a situation in which you felt helpless you would freak out too. Keeping this in mind there are some ways to make it easier to help your child help themselves doing a tantrum.

  1. Validate what they are feeling in the moment. If your kid is screaming because they want to keep playing and not sit down to eat lunch even you can understand that. Imagine the alarm just went off and you don’t want to get up for work. Similar feeling. So get down to their level, look them in the eye and validate that feeling, “I know you want to keep playing because its more fun than eating lunch.”
  2. Compromise, and give them an alternative. “You can finish playing when we finish eating lunch, your toys will wait for you.”
  3. Connect with them. Sometimes when a child misbehaves they are really looking for a physical connection. Giving them that connection can help ground their emotions and lets them know its ok to feel the way they do. A simple way to gain a physical connection everyday is a hug.
  4. Choices!! This is a toddlers bread and butter. Choices help them feel like they have some control over their life. So give them two or three options that work in the moment that you approve of. They still end up doing what you want, but by their own choice.