Tag Archives: experiment

Science Freaks: Make and Egg Shell Disappear

Have you ever wondered what an egg looks like on the inside? Eggs are such a unique and special part of life. But when you crack them open they are different than they looked before. It is nearly impossible to see what they look like, untouched inside the shell. Or is it?

This fun experiment from Go Science Girls will help you to finally see inside of an egg. This is so different than a hard boiled egg which only lets you see the firm outer egg white layer. This experiment will help you to remove the outer shell while keeping the white membrane and yellow yolk fully intact.

This experiment can pose a few questions. Is the egg white an important part of the egg? What protects the eggs, the shell, or the egg white? What will happen if the egg shell is removed? what will happen if there is no egg white?

Discuss with your kids why both the egg shell and the white membrane are important. Check out this article about the anatomy of an egg and why each part is important.

Head on over to Go Science Girls for a full tutorial on how to achieve this incredible science experiment. Be sure to check out some other cool experiments while you are there. They do not disappoint!

Science is Fun: Oil and Water Experiment

Science is fun. When a child is able to put their hands on something and find out how it works and why it works they learn so much better. What is more exciting than trying something out on your own? This month we want to share a fun science experiment that will allow your kids to discover the difference between oil and water. Thank you to Growing a Jeweled Rose for creating such a fun and unique way to interact with water and oil. This new experiment will allow you show your kids the property differences of oil and water with a glowing experiment. You and your kids will be excited to create a glowing magical world with oil and water. Head on over to Growing a Jeweled Rose to learn exactly how to create this magical experiment at home. Check out just why oil and water are so different below. While you and your kids create the magical glowing world you can share all your knowledge of oil and water and their similar yet different properties.

Oil and Water:

Oil and water are two liquids that are immiscible, meaning they will not mix together. Liquids tend to be immiscible when the force of attraction between the molecules of the same liquid is greater than the force of attraction between the two different liquids. Although this experiment uses the same volume of oil as water, the two liquids have different masses and therefore, different densities. Density is a measure of how much of a substance is contained in a specific volume of liquid. A liquid that is less dense than water will float on the water; a liquid that has a greater density will sink. To gain an understanding of density, think of two zippered plastic bags of the same size (same volume). Imagine that one bag contains 10 marbles and the other 20 marbles. The bag containing 20 marbles is denser than the bag containing 10 marbles because it contains more material – even though it is the same material. This analogy describes the relative densities of different concentrations of the same substance. Also, imagine that there is a third bag containing 10 very large marbles. The volume of the material is the same, the number of molecules (marbles) are the same but again, the bag of large marbles contains more material – it has a greater mass and so a greater density. This analogy represents the experiment above since two different materials are used. The objects added to the container will float at different levels according to their density. If the density of the object is similar to that of water, the object will float in the water. If similar to the oil, the object will float in the oil.

What does it matter?

Getting oil and water to mix is at the very heart of cleaning dishes and clothes. A lot of agents that make dishes and clothes dirty are greasy or contain oil. Water alone is not attracted to these compounds. However, because a detergent has one end that is attracted to oil-like molecules, detergents tend to bind to dirt, grease and oil. The other half of the detergent binds to water molecules, allowing the soiling agent to be washed away.  

How Strong is Spaghetti?: A STEM Activity

Frugal Fun 4 Boys has always been one of our favorite blogs. If you still aren’t following Sarah, you are missing out. We have been highlighting Sarah’s amazing ideas for years, and once again, we just have to share her brilliance.

STEM is such an important part of our education system now, after all, STEM activities are jobs in the future. STEM doesn’t have to be difficult, frightening, or intimidating. It can be fun, exciting, and easy to do.

How strong is spaghetti

This fun spaghetti project helps kids to understand how engineers go about choosing material for building bridges and other structures. It shows how some material works well in one scenario, but does badly in another. Sarah says the experiment is meant for children 13+ but it works well with children younger than that as well as long as parents can read the article with their kids and make it more understandable according to the age group and level.

Make sure you check out some of Sarah’so the great ideas at Frugal Fun 4 Boys. We mean it, you do not want to miss out!

Now it is your family’s turn to find out: how strong is spaghetti? And we would love to hear what your discovered, so please leave us a comment below.